Archive for 'Stock market'

Some of the experts were predicting that the market would be going through a correction in the first month of the new year and now you have the opportunity to add to your portfolio at some bargain prices.

After the worst start in history for U.S. stocks, everyone will be searching for meaning. One strategy has worked for almost seven years, but what about now?

Is it time to “buy the dip?”

Prior Theme Recap

In my last WTWA, I predicted that the start of a new year would focus attention on one of the several different “January effects.” This proved to be a secondary consideration. Instead, news from China rippled around the world, pressuring U.S. trading before Monday’s opening. The China story continued through Thursday. Even a strong employment report on Friday could not reverse the selling pressure. There are some still debating the seasonal effects, but it was a minor theme last week. You can see the sad story for stocks from Doug Short’s weekly chart. (With the ever-increasing effects from foreign markets, you should also add Doug’s World Markets Weekend Update to your reading list).

Jeff Miller

 

 

 

 

A lot of us start out investing in different Mutual Funds for retirement because we feel that we need to be more aggressive in building up our portfolio.  Now that retirement is just around the corner or maybe it’s already arrived, it may be time to move that portfolio into something more stable.  Here’s a couple ideas to do that .

In a previous article, I discussed various ways that investors can accumulate their nest egg. One strategy includes putting a portion in one or a few attractively valued dividend growth stocks every single month and reinvesting dividends selectively. The other strategy involved investing in index funds, using tax advantaged accounts such as 401(k) for example.

Traditional vehicles for saving such as index funds and target-date funds work well when you accumulate your nest egg, but could present a challenge if you try to live off them. Many retirees prefer to have a stable and growing source of income, which maintains purchasing power over time, and is not dependent on the manic-depressive swings in stock prices. Therefore, investing in dividend growth stocks is the ideal way to generate income from your nest egg in retirement, due to the stability of dividend income. Therefore, if someone were to accumulate their nest egg in other items such as index funds, but wanted to convert to dividend investing, there are two ways that they can achieve that.

The strategies outlined in this article also work for situations where you have a lump sum amount, and you are thinking of investing it.

The first strategy involves selling all funds in your portfolio, and using the proceeds immediately to create a diversified portfolio of quality dividend-paying stocks.

This strategy is quick and easy to achieve, as it involves just a few steps. If you want to make the conversion all at once and not have to worry about how to invest the amounts for months, this is likely the best deal for you. If you could find 20-30 quality dividend-paying companies, which are also attractively valued, and your money is spread in several sectors, you could be done with this exercise in one day. After that, the only thing to worry about would be to monitor the investments, decide what to do with dividend income, and enjoy life.

 

Read more on Dividend investing

Picking Stock Market Winners the Easy Way

Picking winners in the Stock Market can be confusing, complex and time intensive sometimes but here’s a system that isn’t really new but it can get you moving in the right direction.

Every week the government and other entities release economic reports that cover all areas of the economy – from retail sales to housing, to international trade to consumer sentiment.

In fact, on virtually any given day there could be anywhere from one to a handful of reports.

And while the financial media does cover them, they usually focus on headline numbers without doing a deeper dive.

This is unfortunate because within these reports often exists money-making details that can quickly be uncovered with just an extra few minutes of reading.

For example, in the Employment Situation report, it details what sectors saw the most new jobs or labor force expansion, and which ones contracted.

I can remember countless times where that report got me into the right sectors and industries at the right time before anybody else was talking about them.

In fact, I still remember getting into housing in early 2012 while everybody else was staying as far away from it as possible. But, after seeing construction jobs continue to rise in report after report after report, I knew the housing market had turned. And that was one of the first alerts to the housing recovery – for those who knew where to look.

But the headline number and the obligatory one-or-two-sentence write ups on many news sites missed the best part of the story by not going the extra mile (or paragraph).

Well here we are again, with more stock-picking insight, straight from last week’s Employment Situation report. Last week it showed that some of the biggest job creation came from these three industries:

1) Retail Trade +36,000
(up 322,000 over the past year)

2) Food Services and Drinking Places +29,000
(up 376,000 over the past year)

 

Zacks employment strategy

Gold, Silver, Copper & Oil-Oh My!

Gold prices hit a five year low earlier this week and some have attributed the decline that Chinese investors are selling to meet margin demands.  There’s also less  Chinese demand for copper, silver,  iron , oil and palladium and that decreased demand will continue through the rest of the year. You also have to factor in the relation of a stronger US  Dollar to weaker commodity prices overall.

See more about Gold and Oil

Time to Rethink IBM Stock?

There hasn’t been much to write home about when it comes to IBM stock. It’s been all negative, with a lackluster second quarter, thirteen quarters in a row with a negative performance, dubbed one of the most universally despised companies in the world, blah, blah and more blah. It’s depressing. So, why rethink IBM stock? Because IBM has over$12 billion cash from last year, its dividend yield is a decent 3.2%, and because it has increased its dividend by 18% per year over the past five years. Bob Ciura makes a case for IBM below

It’s no secret that IBM (NYSE:IBM) is struggling. IBM is one of the most universally despised companies in the world. The stock has been on a nearly unimpeded decline for a disturbingly long time. Shares of IBM are down 17% in the past year. In fact, IBM was the worst performing stock in the Dow Jones Industrial Average in both 2013 and 2014. There don’t seem to be enough negative things to say about IBM.

The criticism of IBM got even more heated after the company’s second quarter earnings, when IBM posted its 13th quarter in a row of declining revenue. One bright spot was the company’s progress in what it calls its ‘strategic imperatives’, which are higher-growth businesses like big data, the cloud, and security. Unfortunately, strong growth in these areas wasn’t even enough to satisfy analysts, who were quick to point out that these businesses are still too small to have any material impact.

But it’s worth digging deeper into IBM’s turnaround to find out whether this is actually true.

Strategic Imperatives Are Not Getting Enough Credit

It seems nobody is giving much credit to IBM for its strategic imperatives, but this is a mistake. These businesses are growing at impressive rates. Cloud revenue soared more than 70% adjusted for currency and cloud delivered as a service has reached an $8.7 billion annualized rate. Social revenue jumped more than 40% year to date excluding currency, and mobile revenue has more than quadrupled. Collectively, the strategic imperatives grew revenue by more than 30% over the first two quarters of the year adjusting for currency and divestments.

The bearish argument is that $8 billion represents a drop in the bucket for a company the size of IBM, and therefore the strategic imperatives are too inconsequential to stem the decline in IBM’s other businesses. But again, it’s worth noting that excluding foreign exchange and divestments, the overall decline is very modest. And, should those businesses keep growing anywhere close to 30% per year, it won’t take long at all for those businesses to become a very important part of the overall company.

This is already starting to happen. IBM stated in its 2014 annual report that in 2009, its strategic imperatives represented just 13% of its total revenue. Last year, these businesses accounted for 27%, more than doubling in that time. This year, the percentage will be even higher, and that should only continue going forward.

Read more about IBM here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Passive Income From Stock Investing

It’s the stuff of dreams. I like to call it “mailbox money”. It’s not for everybody and it’s not very exciting, but man, it works. In fact it works really, really well. Here’s one guy’s story that collects $450,000 from his “mailbox”.

Retired since 1975, Harry is an experienced investor who has been able to survive and thrive from his initial investment decisions. When I see him, we talk mainly about the stock market, and how to be successful in it. During my last chat with Harry, I asked him whether he has ever sold a stock. His answer surprised me. He said, “No.”

Think about that. Here is someone who invested roughly $700,000 in a basket of stocks, and has never sold a single company he bought in the last 40 years. That is not to say he has not bought anything since 1975. He does reinvest his dividends in new companies, and due to mergers and acquisitions, he will come into new cash that he can invest. He told me this, “I have over five million people working for me right now, and they pay me 9¢ each to work for me.” He told me he is paid $450,000 in dividends from his initial investments in 1975. This is a man who literally survives primarily on his dividend income.

See the full story by Thomas Pound

Zacks 3 Top Breakout Stocks

Finding stocks with a clear long term upward pattern is pretty exciting for most investors and Zacks shows three stocks that you can invest in right now. You can ride the on going momentum now and/or short the stocks at a later time. See the full article at Breakout Stocks

Financial Advisor Prefers Modesty for Retirees

After the financial pummeling investors have endured over the last decade, there is a palpable loss of confidence in the stock market – and a loss of patience. In response to the demand from increasingly conservative consumers, safer financial strategies are slowly evolving, even as riskier propositions are dying out. Financial advisors have not always sought to protect client portfolios from market risk, preferring a “wait and hope” approach to investing that relies in the market to bounce back up when it dips. But now, an entire generation of investors is looking for a safety net for their capital in retirement – and that’s exactly what today’s savvy financial advisors, like John Convery, aim to provide.

As founder and CEO of The Educated Wealth Center, LLC in West Palm Beach Florida, John describes himself as an advocate and educator for retirees. “You shouldn’t have to lose sleep at night wondering if you’ll have enough to live comfortably. There are proven strategies that align your resources properly to ensure you will always have enough,” he says. One of those proven strategies lies in knowing how to use annuities to ensure a constant flow of income – a pitch that isn’t always popular.

Annuities have developed a bad reputation, and some of it is deserved. Once you’ve heard one horror story, it’s hard not to treat every one of the dozens of different types of annuities as suspect. You’ve probably heard the story of the retiree died before pulling his money out of his annuities – and the insurance company kept the money. It’s the black sheep in the Annuity family that everyone talks about. But annuities deserve a second look. When it comes to protecting capital while still maintaining steady cash flow, fixed indexed annuities especially can be a central component of a solid portfolio.

When advising his clients, John Convery lists the safest types of investments: certificates and deposits with certain banks, US Treasury Notes, Fixed and Indexed Annuities. The problem with all of those investments, he says, is that interest rates are so low that “You die a death of a thousand cuts.” Indexed annuities are the notable exception.

“We like to see clients using indexing so they can benefit from the gains of the market without risking the losses. Over time, indexing should allow them to keep their incomes in pace with inflation.” However, he warns, “It’s not going to allow you to make a fortune in the market. But over time, it should allow you to outperform inflation. If you can accomplish that, then you’re going to be all right. Modest goals for a modest time, but in a market this volatile, feeling financially secure is worth a fortune.”

Read more: http://www.educatedwealthcenter.com/john-convery-west-palm-beach-fl.php

CONTACT: Matt Collins, 800-980-1626, matt@celebritybrandingagency.com

Web Site: http://www.educatedwealthcenter.com

It’s a story that’s not new because we’ve all heard it so many times before over the years. Only the names have changed. New guy takes over the top spot in the company. Results are nothing to write home about or brag about at the golf course, but top guy still gets super achiever raises. Any manager below him would have been fired  a long time ago, or money taken out of his check for poor performance. Where’s the justice?

Let’s hear it for the corporate boss who gets a 20% raise — or maybe 88%, depending how you count — when his company lost shareholders 6.4% for the year, saw returns trail the S&P 500 by 8.5 percentage points, and has seen returns trail its industry by 12 points over the last three years.

This man of steel — whose compensation can withstand the slings and arrows of muddled performance — is none other than the chairman and chief executive of steelmaker Nucor (NUE), Daniel R. DiMicco. According to the proxy filed this morning, DiMicco’s total compensation rose to $8.1 million for 2011, from $6.8 million in 2010. The biggest chunk of that change came from his cash bonus, which rose to $1.5 million from $540,000.

That’s using the standard compensation calculation required by the Securities and Exchange Commission. But like many companies chafing at the comp-disclosure bit, Nucor offers an “alternative” calculus —  and one that is even more eye-opening: By Nucor’s measure, DiMicco’s 2011 pay rose a whopping 88% over the prior year, to $5.3 million from $2.8 million. (The chief difference between the two measures is that the “alternative” attempts to exclude “compensation that may possibly be earned but is not guaranteed” by ignoring options and reducing the stock-award value by some voodoo the company doesn’t explain very clearly.)

 Shareholders, meantime, would have done better to invest in just about any major stock index during 2011 (the period covered by the proxy). The one place shareholders would have done worse, on a total-return basis, is the rest of the steel industry, and we do have to give Nucor some credit here. Nucor outstripped the steel industry by 28 points in 2011, after trailing it by 9 points in 2010 and by 107 points in 2009. DiMicco has run the company since 2000, and has been chairman since 2006; looking over the past three, five and 10 years, the company’s total return has trailed the steel industry’s by between 5 and 12 percentage points, and the S&P 500 by even more.
The shareholders of  this company would have been a lot better off by spreading the risk into other investments. Get #1 Strong Buy Picks from Zacks
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