Real Estate Archives

Rising Home Prices Keep First Time Buyers in Limbo

With the Real Estate market heating up the last couple of years, first time home buyers are in a bit of a quandary. That 20% down payment that they were trying to save for their first home now seems to be a little harder to reach. The problem is that home prices are moving up in certain parts of the country which forces the new buyer to save more and for a longer period of time to achieve that 20% down payment . Of course, there are other options too, like VA or FHA financing which require less in the way of a down payment.

For future home buyers wondering when to stop saving and get into the housing market, the math is clear: the sooner the better. With home values forcasted to rise in every major U.S. metro over the next year, a 20 percent down payment on the median-priced home today will cost thousands of dollars more just one year from now.

Nationally, the median home will be worth $6,275 more a year from now, according to Zillow®‘s home value forecasts. That means the average U.S. buyer will need to save an additional $105 a month – $1,260 total over the next year – just to account for how much more a 20 percent down payment will cost a year from now.  

In hot coastal markets like San Jose, home values are expected to rise as much as $35,934 by this time next year, the highest annual dollar increase of the metros analyzed. A buyer in 2018 will then need $7,188 more for a down payment on the median home than they would today. For those saving on a monthly basis for a future home purchase, that equates to putting away an additional $599 a month just to keep up with home value appreciation, let alone whatever else is needed for the down payment itself. Future home buyers in Seattle, San Diego and Riverside, Calif. can also expect to spend thousands of dollars more on down payments for the median home a year from now.

Saving for a down payment is one of the biggest hurdles to homeownershipi. That may be why more than half (59 percent) of all first-time buyers today put less than 20 percent down on their home purchase, according to Zillow Group’s Consumer Housing Trends Report 2017. However, a small down payment does not come without risks. The report also found that buyers with larger down payments are more likely to get their offer accepted, averaging just 1.9 total offers before winning their house compared to 2.4 for buyers with lower down payments. When time is money, a low down payment can be costly.

“Sky-high rents and rising home prices are putting first-time buyers in a bit of a catch-22,” says Dr. Svenja Gudell, Zillow chief economist. “Buying now with a low down payment can be riskier, and the offer may not be considered as competitive by the seller. However, a renter who saves for another year to reach a larger down payment may find that the home they love today is outside their budget a year from now. For those considering buying in the next year, getting into the market today may make more financial sense than they think.”

Buyers can use the Zillow affordability calculator to see how much they can actually afford to spend on a home, based on their income, debt and savings. The Zillow mortgage calculator can also provide custom down payment estimates based on home price and interest rates.

Zillow is the leading real estate and rental marketplace dedicated to empowering consumers with data, inspiration and knowledge around the place they call home, and connecting them with the best local professionals who can help. In addition, Zillow operates an industry-leading economics and analytics bureau led by Zillow Group’s Chief Economist Dr. Svenja Gudell. Dr. Gudell and her team of economists and data analysts produce extensive housing data and research covering more than 450 markets at Zillow Real Estate Research. Zillow also sponsors the quarterly Zillow Home Price Expectations Survey, which asks more than 100 leading economists, real estate experts and investment and market strategists to predict the path of the Zillow Home Value Index over the next five years. Launched in 2006, Zillow is owned and operated by Zillow Group, Inc. (NASDAQ:Z and ZG), and headquartered in Seattle.

Zillow is a registered trademark of Zillow, Inc.

i According to the first Zillow Housing Aspirations Report (ZHAR), a semi-annual survey of 10,000 Americans seeking insight into their views on homeownership and their housing plans.

RELATED LINKS

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Claiming Tax Deductions for Your Rental Property

Investing in Real Estate has been around probably since the first tepee was built and it shows no signs for the moment of letting up in it’s popularity. The cable channels have about a dozen different shows on buying junkers, fixing and flipping for a profit. Seems like everybody is making a fortune but we all know that Uncle Sam gets his cut too. But there are a few things that you can do to make his cut a little smaller. Read on…

Single-family homes and small apartments or office buildings are popular investment vehicles for small investors. Many people consider owning rental houses not much different than owning their own home. Like owning a home, mortgage payments that finance the purchase of a rental property can eat up a large chunk of the rental income. To encourage housing availability for renters, the Internal Revenue Service allows tax deductions on a number of rental property expenses.

Rental Property Deductions

Similar to the home mortgage deduction, interest paid during the year on the mortgages of your rental properties are tax-deductible. The property taxes are also deductible. Unlike the home mortgage deduction, all rental property expenses are itemized on Schedule E. If you own more than one property, the form provides space for the itemization of expenses for each property separately. You can also deduct other rental property expenses, including utilities paid, landscaping, and maintenance and repair costs.

Active Investor

You can fully deduct your mortgage interest and many other expenses for each property if you actively engaged in the management of your properties. To be an active investor, you do not need to make all repairs or physically show the properties to tenants. You can hire a management firm and still be considered an active investor if, for example, you review and approve a tenant’s application or you approve repairs that exceed a certain dollar amount.

Limits

If you have a significant net loss on your rental properties, you may encounter limits on what you can deduct. The IRS allows an active investor to fully deduct the total net loss on rental properties up to $25,000 if your modified adjusted gross income is no more than $100,000, you participate in no other passive activities, and you have no current or prior year disallowed losses or credits from passive activities.

Passive or Personal Use

If you were a passive investor, you can deduct the expenses up to the amount of income you received for each respective property. You will also need to complete Form 8582 to determine what portion of the loss, if any, you can offset against other passive income. If you used the house for personal use but rented it out for at least 15 days, as with a vacation home, you can deduct mortgage interest and real estate taxes, but many of the other expenses may not be deductible.

Record Keeping

As with the mortgage for your personal residence, the lender must send you Form 1098, a mortgage interest statement, by January 31 following the end of the tax year for each property you own. Keep these and other property expense records to use for completing Schedule E and, if necessary Form 8582.

 

Rental Property Deductions

California House

The California Association of Realtors recently released a detailed report with regard to the sales activity in the California market and one set of numbers show that a common problem still exists and that problem is that there are less homes for sale this year as compared to last year. The good news is that prices are still rising and appreciation is alive and well.

 

California’s housing market eased into the fall home buying season as seasonally adjusted sales rose both month-to-month and year-to-year in September, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.) said today.  

Closed escrow sales of existing, single-family detached homes in California remained above the 400,000 benchmark for the past 18 months and totaled a seasonally adjusted annualized rate of 436,920 units in September, according to information collected by C.A.R. from more than 90 local REALTOR® associations and MLSs statewide. The statewide sales figure represents what would be the total number of homes sold during 2017 if sales maintained the September pace throughout the year. It is adjusted to account for seasonal factors that typically influence home sales.

The September sales figure was up 2.2 percent from the 427,630 level in August and up 1.7 percent compared with home sales in September 2016 of a revised 429,760. While year-to-date sales are running 2.6 percent ahead of last year’s pace, that margin has been eroding since the first quarter.

“While it’s encouraging that statewide home sales improved both monthly and annually, the year-over-year sales rate is losing steam, reflecting the persistent shortage of homes for sale and an easing of concern over a surge in mortgage rates,” said C.A.R. President Geoff McIntosh. “Additionally, for the areas that have been affected by the recent wildfires, we anticipate sales will pull back in those regions as damages are assessed and replacement efforts are coordinated.”

After reaching its highest level in a decade in August, the statewide median price slipped in September but remained above the $500,000 mark for the seventh straight month. The $565,330 August median price dropped 1.8 percent to $555,410 in September but climbed 7.5 percent from the revised $516,450 recorded in September 2016. The median sales price is the point at which half of homes sold for more and half sold for less; it is influenced by the types of homes selling, as well as a general change in values.

“The statewide median price rose at the fastest annual pace since February 2017 as the housing supply shortage continued to dictate the market, taking a toll on home sales and affordability,” said C.A.R. Senior Vice President and Chief Economist Leslie-Appleton-Young. “The tight inventory situation is particularly acute in the Bay Area region, which saw double-digit price increases in Alameda, Contra Costa, San Francisco, and Santa Clara counties, while sales fell markedly from the previous year in six of the nine Bay Area counties.”

Other key points from C.A.R.’s September 2017 resale housing report include:

  • All of the major regions experienced month-to-month and annual sales declines, with sales in the San Francisco Bay Area declining 4.2 percent from a year ago, the Inland Empire falling 4.0 percent, and the Los Angeles metro region decreasing 2.5 percent from September 2016.
  • In general, home prices across the state continued to grow in September. Forty-one of the 51 reported counties recorded a year-over-year price increase, with 20 of them growing at double-digit rates.
  • Statewide active listings continued to decline in September, dropping 11.2 percent from a year ago. Since the beginning of the year, active listings have declined by more than 10 percent every month, and the number of available listings for sale has trended downward for more than two years.
  • With strong sales growth and little new inventory to replenish the housing supply, C.A.R.’s Unsold Inventory Index fell from 3.5 months in September 2016 to 3.2 months in September 2017. The index measures the number of months needed to sell the supply of homes on the market at the current sales rate. The index stood at 2.9 months in August.
  • Thirty-six of 51 counties experienced a decline in housing inventory from last year. While every single county in the Southern California region had a reduction in the unsold inventory index from the previous year in September, the Bay Area remained the region with the tightest housing supply. Six of the nine Bay Area counties had less than three months of inventory in September, and of the six, two had less than a two months’ supply.
  • The median number of days it took to sell a single-family home in September was 20 days compared with 18 days in August and 28 days in September 2016.
  • C.A.R.’s sales price-to-list price ratio* was 99.1 percent statewide in September, 99.5 percent in August, and 98.6 percent in September 2016. At the county level, San Francisco had the highest ratio at 116.6 percent and Mariposa had the lowest at 92.5 percent.
  • The average price per square foot** for an existing, single-family home statewide was $270 in September, $268 in August, and $254 in September 2016.
  • San Mateo had the highest price per square foot in September at $883/sq. ft., followed by San Francisco ($875/sq. ft.), and Santa Clara ($687/sq. ft.). Counties with the lowest price per square foot in September included Lassen ($118/sq. ft.), Kings ($132/sq. ft.), and Kern ($136/sq. ft.).
  • Mortgage rates declined further in September as 30-year, fixed-mortgage interest rates averaged 3.81 percent in September, down from 3.88 percent in August but was up from 3.46 percent in September 2016, according to Freddie Mac. The five-year, adjustable-rate mortgage interest rate edged up in September to an average of 3.16 percent from 3.15 percent in August but was up from 2.74 percent in September 2016.

Note:  The County MLS median price and sales data in the tables are generated from a survey of more than 90 associations of REALTORS® throughout the state, and represent statistics of existing single-family detached homes only. County sales data are not adjusted to account for seasonal factors that can influence home sales.  Movements in sales prices should not be interpreted as changes in the cost of a standard home.  The median price is where half sold for more and half sold for less; medians are more typical than average prices, which are skewed by a relatively small share of transactions at either the lower-end or the upper-end. Median prices can be influenced by changes in cost, as well as changes in the characteristics and the size of homes sold.  The change in median prices should not be construed as actual price changes in specific homes.

*Sales-to-list price ratio is an indicator that reflects the negotiation power of home buyers and home sellers under current market conditions. The ratio is calculated by dividing the final sales price of a property by its last list price and is expressed as a percentage.  A sales-to-list ratio with 100 percent or above suggests that the property sold for more than the list price, and a ratio below 100 percent indicates that the price sold below the asking price.

**Price per square foot is a measure commonly used by real estate agents and brokers to determine how much a square foot of space a buyer will pay for a property.  It is calculated as the sale price of the home divided by the number of finished square feet.  C.A.R. currently tracks price-per-square foot statistics for 39 counties.

Leading the way…® in California real estate for more than 110 years, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (www.car.org) is one of the largest state trade organizations in the United States with more than 190,000 members dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. C.A.R. is headquartered in Los Angeles.

SOURCE CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS

CONTACT: Lotus Lou, (213) 739-8304, lotusl@car.org

RELATED LINKS
http://www.car.org

 

 

NAR Report on Rising Home Prices

The crazy price increases of the early 2000’s are gone . Values since that time have dropped dramatically and finally stabilized and now we’re seeing a more normal market with regard to rising prices. The report below from the National Association of Realtors highlights where values have increased.

A promising climb in home sales throughout the country amidst insufficient supply caused home prices to steadily rise in most metro areas during the second quarter, according to the latest quarterly report by the National Association of Realtors®.

The median existing single-family home price increased in 93 percent of measured markets1, with 163 out of 176 metropolitan statistical areas2 (MSAs) showing gains based on closings in the second quarter compared with the second quarter of 2014. Thirteen areas (7 percent) recorded lower median prices from a year earlier.

The number of rising markets in the second quarter increased compared to the first quarter, when price gains were recorded in 85 percent of metro areas. Thirty-four metro areas in the second quarter (19 percent) experienced double-digit increases, a decline from the 51 metro areas in the first quarter. Nineteen metro areas (11 percent) experienced double-digit increases in the second quarter of 2014.

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says the housing market has shifted into a higher gear in recent months. “Steady rent increases, the slow rise in mortgage rates and stronger local job markets fueled demand throughout most of the country this spring,” he said. “While this led to a boost in sales paces not seen since before the downturn, overall supply failed to keep up and pushed prices higher in a majority of metro areas.”

Adds Yun, “With home prices and rents continuing to rise and wages showing only modest growth, declining affordability remains a hurdle for renters considering homeownership – especially in higher-priced markets.”

The national median existing single-family home price in the second quarter was $229,400, up 8.2 percent from the second quarter of 2014 ($212,000). The median price during the first quarter of this year increased 7.1 percent from a year earlier.

The five most expensive housing markets in the second quarter were the San Jose, Calif., metro area, where the median existing single-family price was $980,000; San Francisco, $841,600; AnaheimSanta Ana, Calif., $685,700; Honolulu, $698,600; and San Diego, $547,800.

The five lowest-cost metro areas in the second quarter were Cumberland, Md., where the median single-family home price was $82,400; YoungstownWarrenBoardman, Ohio, $85,000; Rockford, Ill., $94,700; Decatur, Ill., $96,000; and Elmira, N.Y., $98,300.

Total existing-home sales3, including single family and condo, increased 6.6 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.30 million in the second quarter from 4.97 million in the first quarter, and are 8.5 percent higher than the 4.89 million pace during the second quarter of 2014.

“The ongoing rise in home values in recent years has greatly benefited homeowners by increasing their household wealth,” says Yun. “In the meantime, inequality is growing in America because the downward trend in the homeownership rate means these equity gains are going to fewer households.”

At the end of the second quarter, there were 2.30 million existing homes available for sale4, slightly above the 2.29 million homes for sale at the end of the second quarter in 2014. The average supply during the second quarter was 5.1 months – down from 5.5 months a year ago.

Metro area condominium and cooperative prices – covering changes in 61 metro areas – showed the national median existing-condo price was $217,400 in the second quarter, up 3.1 percent from the second quarter of 2014 ($210,800). Fifty metro areas (82 percent) showed gains in their median condo price from a year ago; 11 areas had declines.

Rising home prices weighed on affordability in the second quarter compared to the second quarter of last year despite an uptick in the national family median income ($66,637)5. To purchase a single-family home at the national median price, a buyer making a 5 percent downpayment would need an income of $49,195, a 10 percent downpayment would require an income of $46,605, and $41,427 would be needed for a 20 percent downpayment.

NAR President Chris Polychron, executive broker with 1st Choice Realty in Hot Springs, Ark., says Realtors® are reporting strong competition and limited days on market for available homes – especially at the entry-level price range. “Buyers should work with their Realtor® to deploy a negotiation strategy that helps their offer stand out,” he said. “If a bidding war occurs, it’s important for the buyer to stay patient and only counteroffer up to what he or she can comfortably afford. It’s better to walk away and wait for the right home instead of being in a situation where one has purchased a home above their means.”

Regional Breakdown
Total existing-home sales in the Northeast increased 10.3 percent in the second quarter and are 8.6 percent above the second quarter of 2014. The median existing single-family home price in the Northeast was $269,300 in the second quarter, up 5.2 percent from a year ago.

In the Midwest, existing-home sales jumped 13.4 percent in the second quarter and are 12.7 percent higher than a year ago. The median existing single-family home price in the Midwest increased 8.7 percent to $182,000 in the second quarter from the same quarter a year ago.

Existing-home sales in the South fell rose 1.1 percent in the second quarter and are 6.3 percent above the second quarter of 2014. The median existing single-family home price in the South was $202,900 in the second quarter, 8.7 percent above a year earlier.

In the West, existing-home sales climbed 8.1 percent in the second quarter and are 8.1 percent above a year ago. The median existing single-family home price in the West increased 9.6 percent to $325,200 in the second quarter from the second quarter of 2014.

The National Association of Realtors®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

NOTE: NAR releases quarterly median single-family price data for approximately 170 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). In some cases the MSA prices may not coincide with data released by state and local Realtor® associations. Any discrepancy may be due to differences in geographic coverage, product mix, and timing. In the event of discrepancies, Realtors® are advised that for business purposes, local data from their association may be more relevant.

Data tables for MSA home prices (single family and condo) are posted at http://www.realtor.org/topics/metropolitan-median-area-prices-and-affordability/data. If insufficient data is reported for a MSA in particular quarter, it is listed as N/A. For areas not covered in the tables, please contact the local association of Realtors®.

1The Ann Arbor, MI MSA and Harrisburg-Carlisle, PA MSA will now be included in the single-family price report.

2Areas are generally metropolitan statistical areas as defined by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. NAR adheres to the OMB definitions, although in some areas an exact match is not possible from the available data. A list of counties included in MSA definitions is available at:  http://www.census.gov/population/estimates/metro-city/List4.txt.

Regional median home prices are from a separate sampling that includes rural areas and portions of some smaller metros that are not included in this report; the regional percentage changes do not necessarily parallel changes in the larger metro areas. The only valid comparisons for median prices are with the same period a year earlier due to seasonality in buying patterns. Quarter-to-quarter comparisons do not compensate for seasonal changes, especially for the timing of family buying patterns.

Median price measurement reflects the types of homes that are selling during the quarter and can be skewed at times by changes in the sales mix. For example, changes in the level of distressed sales, which are heavily discounted, can vary notably in given markets and may affect percentage comparisons. Annual price measures generally smooth out any quarterly swings.

NAR began tracking of metropolitan area median single-family home prices in 1979; the metro area condo price series dates back to 1989.
Because there is a concentration of condos in high-cost metro areas, the national median condo price often is higher than the median single-family price. In a given market area, condos typically cost less than single-family homes. As the reporting sample expands in the future, additional areas will be included in the condo price report.

3The seasonally adjusted annual rate for a particular quarter represents what the total number of actual sales for a year would be if the relative sales pace for that quarter was maintained for four consecutive quarters. Total home sales include single family, townhomes, condominiums and co-operative housing.

Seasonally adjusted rates are used in reporting quarterly data to factor out seasonal variations in resale activity. For example, sales volume normally is higher in the summer and relatively light in winter, primarily because of differences in the weather and household buying patterns.

4Total inventory and month’s supply data are available back through 1999, while single-family inventory and month’s supply are available back to 1982 (prior to 1999, single-family sales accounted for more than 90 percent of transactions and condos were measured only on a quarterly basis).

5Income figures are rounded to the nearest hundred, based on NAR modeling of Census data. Qualifying income requirements are determined using several scenarios on downpayment percentages and assume 25 percent of gross income devoted to mortgage principal and interest at a mortgage interest rate of 4.0%.

NOTE: Existing-Home Sales for July will be released August 20, and the Pending Home Sales Index for July will be released August 27; release times are 10:00 a.m. EDT.

Information about NAR is available at www.realtor.org. This and other news releases are posted in the “News, Blogs and Videos” tab on the website. Statistical data in this release, as well as other tables and surveys, are posted in the “Research and Statistics” tab.

CONTACT: Adam DeSanctis, 202/383-1178, adesanctis@realtors.org

RELATED LINKS
http://www.realtor.org

The latest statistics from Corelogic shows that completed foreclosures continue dropping and are at their lowest numbers since 2007.  The numbers for mortgages in default over 90 days have also declined from a year ago.

CoreLogic® (NYSE: CLGX), a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider, today released its June 2015 National Foreclosure Report which shows that the foreclosure inventory declined by 28.9 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 14.8 percent since June 2014. The number of foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 50,000 in June 2014 to 43,000 in June 2015, representing a decrease of 63.3 percent from the peak of 117,119 completed foreclosures in September 2010, according to CoreLogic data.

Experience the interactive Multimedia News Release here:  http://www.multivu.com/players/English/71280543-corelogic-june-2015-foreclosures/

Completed foreclosures are an indication of the total number of homes actually lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 5.8 million completed foreclosures across the country, and since home ownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 7.8 million homes lost to foreclosure.

As of June 2015, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 472,000, or 1.2 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 664,000 homes, or 1.7 percent, in June 2014. The June 2015 foreclosure rate is the lowest since December 2007.

CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due, including those loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 23.3 percent from June 2014 to June 2015, with 1.3 million mortgages, or 3.5 percent, falling into this category. This is the lowest serious delinquency rate since January 2008. On a month-over-month basis, the number of seriously delinquent mortgages declined by 3.4 percent.

“The foreclosure rate for the U.S. has dropped to its lowest level since 2007, supported by a continuing decline in loans made before 2009, gains in employment, and higher housing prices,” said Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “The decline has not been uniform geographically, as the foreclosure rate varies across metropolitan areas. In the Denver and San Francisco areas, the foreclosure rate has fallen to 0.3 percent, whereas in the Tampa market the rate is 3.5 percent and in Nassau and Suffolk counties it is an elevated 4.8 percent.”

“Serious delinquency is at the lowest level in seven and a half years reflecting the benefits of slow but steady improvements in the economy and rising home prices,” said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “We are also seeing the positive impact of more stringent underwriting criteria for loans originated since 2009 which has helped to lower the national seriously delinquent rate.”

Additional highlights as of June 2015:

  • On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures increased by 4.8 percent from the 41,000* reported in May 2015*. As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006.
  • The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in June 2015 were: Florida (102,000), Michigan (46,000), Texas (33,000), California (29,000) and Ohio (27,000). These five states accounted for almost half of all completed foreclosures nationally.
  • Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in June 2015: South Dakota (32), the District of Columbia (107), North Dakota (313), Wyoming (499) and West Virginia (566).
  • Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory as a percentage of all mortgaged homes: New Jersey (4.7 percent), New York (3.7 percent), Florida (2.7 percent), Hawaii (2.5 percent) and the District of Columbia (2.4 percent).
  • The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory as a percentage of all mortgaged homes were: Alaska (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.4 percent), Montana (0.4 percent) Nebraska (0.4 percent) and North Dakota (0.4 percent).

*May 2015 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results.

Judicial Foreclosure States Ranking (Ranked by Completed Foreclosures)

Non-Judicial Foreclosure States Ranking (Ranked by Completed Foreclosures)

Foreclosure Data for the Largest Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs) (Ranked by Completed Foreclosures)

Figure 1 – Number of Mortgaged Homes per Completed Foreclosure

Figure 2 – Foreclosure Inventory as of June 2015

Figure 3 – Foreclosure Inventory by State

For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog.

Methodology
The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through June 2015.

This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics.

A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender’s real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In “foreclosure by advertisement” states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in “foreclosure by advertisement” states at the completion of the auction.

The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is “started,” and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender’s REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data.

Source: CoreLogic
The data provided is for use only by the primary recipient or the primary recipient’s publication or broadcast. This data may not be re-sold, republished or licensed to any other source, including publications and sources owned by the primary recipient’s parent company without prior written permission from CoreLogic. Any CoreLogic data used for publication or broadcast, in whole or in part, must be sourced as coming from CoreLogic, a data and analytics company. For use with broadcast or web content, the citation must directly accompany first reference of the data. If the data is illustrated with maps, charts, graphs or other visual elements, the CoreLogic logo must be included on screen or website. For questions, analysis or interpretation of the data, contact Lori Guyton at lguyton@cvic.com or Bill Campbell at bill@campbelllewis.com. Data provided may not be modified without the prior written permission of CoreLogic. Do not use the data in any unlawful manner. This data is compiled from public records, contributory databases and proprietary analytics, and its accuracy is dependent upon these sources.

About CoreLogic
CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider. The company’s combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.

CORELOGIC and the CoreLogic logo are trademarks of CoreLogic, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.

CONTACT: For real estate industry and trade media: Bill Campbell, bill@campbelllewis.com, 212-995-8057; For general news media: Lori Guyton, lguyton@cvic.com, 901-277-6066

RELATED LINKS http://www.corelogic.com

Home Sales for Ultra Wealthy Picking Up Steam

The housing market has it’s ups and downs for all of us, even the ultra rich. With the high end market being flat about a year and a half ago,  it’s now on the uptrend and has been for over a year.  The super rich are now buying up these mega mansions for investment purposes and for other reasons as well.

A growing number of ultra high net worth (UHNW) individuals view homes as ‘opportunity gateways’, driving buying decisions that are based on potential opportunities from owning these luxury residential properties, according to the latest study by Wealth-X and the Sotheby’s International Realty® brand released today.

The UHNW Luxury Real Estate Report: Homes As Opportunity Gateways reveals two trends that are fueling the rise in the number of ultra wealthy individuals who are buying luxury homes:

(1)  International home-buying by UHNW individuals (defined as those with at least US$30 million in assets) from emerging nations seeking a safe investment diversification.
(2)  Home-buying as part of a program to gain citizenship or residency status in foreign nations.

The report provides insight into the UHNW residential real estate opportunities in Sydney and Vancouver for buyers seeking safe investment diversification; and Malta, the Bahamas and Sao Paulo, which may appeal to ultra wealthy buyers who are seeking citizenship or residency through property investment.

The UHNW Residential Real Estate index, tracked by Wealth-X, rose to 115.2 in Q2 2015, an 8.3% rise year-on-year, and the sixth consecutive quarter in which the index has risen. The continued rise in the index reflects the confidence of UHNW individuals to invest in luxury residential real estate.

The index takes into account the full range of luxury residential properties that are owned by the world’s wealthiest individuals. Wealth-X data shows there are 211,275 UHNW individuals globally, who collectively hold nearly US$3 trillion in real estate assets, equal to 10% of their net worth.

Below are other key findings from the report:

  • 12% of second homes purchased by UHNW individuals in emerging countries (those who reside in BRICS nations) are located outside their country of residence.
  • Recent market fluctuations in emerging nations are leading a new generation of UHNW investors to consider investing in luxury residential real estate in Western markets.
  • Chinese UHNW individuals make up the third largest share of foreign UHNW homeowners in the United States, behind only Canada and the United Kingdom.
  • Twenty nations in Europe and the Americas now offer citizenship or residency programs to individuals willing to invest in domestic residential real estate.
  • Many residential real estate markets with such programs – including Sao Paulo, Malta, and the Bahamas – offer good long-term investment opportunities.

Wealth-X President David Friedman commented: “Wealth-X is pleased to partner with the Sotheby’s International Realty brand for this third luxury real estate report for 2015. This new joint study explores the trends and home-buying motivations of a distinct group of ultra wealthy individuals in the emerging markets. As their wealth grows, so will their investment fueled by various motivations, be it to diversify their portfolio or to gain citizenship or residency in a foreign country.”

According to Philip White, president and chief executive officer, Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC, this joint report was designed to provide an understanding of the trends driving buying decisions of ultra high net worth individuals around the world. “The research reveals trends that go beyond traditional motivations and help guide real estate investments that contribute to long-term wealth,” he said.  “It underscores the important role real estate plays in a larger strategy to build a valuable asset portfolio.”

Download the report here.

About Wealth-X
Wealth-X is the global authority on wealth intelligence, providing sales, marketing, strategy and compliance solutions to clients in the financial services, luxury, not-for-profit and education sectors. Its award-winning research and thought leadership are regularly cited by the world’s media such as CNBC, Financial Times, Thomson Reuters and BBC. Wealth-X has more than 250 staff in 10 locations, including Singapore, London and New York. (www.wealthx.com)

About Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC
The Sotheby’s International Realty network currently has approximately 17,000 sales associates located in approximately 800 offices in 61 countries and territories worldwide. Founded in 1976 to provide independent brokerages with a powerful marketing and referral program for luxury listings, the Sotheby’s International Realty network was designed to connect the finest independent real estate companies to the most prestigious clientele in the world. Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC is a subsidiary of Realogy Holdings Corp. (NYSE: RLGY), a global leader in real estate franchising and provider of real estate brokerage, relocation and settlement services.  In February 2004, Realogy entered into a long-term strategic alliance with Sotheby’s, the operator of the auction house.  The agreement provided for the licensing of the Sotheby’s International Realty name and the development of a full franchise system. Affiliations in the system are granted only to brokerages and individuals meeting strict qualifications. Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC supports its affiliates with a host of operational, marketing, recruiting, educational and business development resources. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Franchise affiliates also benefit from an association with the venerable Sotheby’s auction house, established in 1744.

CONTACT: Wealth-X media contact: Fauzi Ahmad, +65 8653 6514, fahmad@wealthx.com; Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC media contact: Lindsey Scharf, +1 (973) 407-5596, lindsey.scharf@sothebysrealty.com

RELATED LINKS http://www.wealthx.com

The report is in for the month of June and the results for home sales in California are showing positive once again according to the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®. Pending home sales were up again over 12 percent as compared to June  2014, marking the seventh straight month of year-to-year gains and the fifth straight month of double-digit advances. A breakdown of distressed sales by County is in the chart below.

LOS ANGELES, July 23, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — California pending home sales continued to gain steam in June, registering seven months of continued annual increases and the fifth consecutive month of double-digit increases, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (C.A.R.) said today.

In a separate report, California REALTORS® responding to C.A.R.’s June Market Pulse Survey saw a reduction in floor calls, listing appointments, and open house traffic, compared with May. The Market Pulse Survey is a monthly online survey of more than 300 California REALTORS®, which measures data about their last closed transaction and sentiment about business activity in their market area for the previous month and the last year.

Pending home sales data:

  • California pending home sales were up 12.5 percent on an annual basis from the revised 107 index recorded in June 2014, marking the seventh straight month of year-to-year gains and the fifth straight month of double-digit advances.
  • Statewide pending home sales fell in June on a month-to-month basis, with the Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI)* decreasing 2.6 percent from a revised 123.6 in May to 120.4, based on signed contracts.  The month-to-month decrease was slightly below the average May-June loss of 1.9 percent observed in the last seven years.
  • A shortage of available homes in the San Francisco Bay Area stifled pending sales in June, pushing the PHSI to 127.9, down 5.3 percent from 135.1 in May and down 0.9 percent from the 129.1 index recorded in June 2014.
  • Pending home sales in Southern California continued last month’s increase by rising 4 percent in June to reach an index of 109.6, up 14.2 percent from the June 2014 index of 96.
  • Central Valley pending sales fell in June, dropping 8.2 percent from May to reach an index of 99.5 in June but up 14.2 percent from the 87.2 index of June 2014.

Equity and distressed housing market data:

  • The share of equity sales – or non-distressed property sales – declined slightly in June to make up 92.4 percent of all home sales, remaining near the highest level since late 2007. Equity sales made up 92.6 percent of all home sales in May and 89.9 percent in June 2014. The share of equity sales has been at or near 90 percent since mid-2014.
  • Conversely, the combined share of all distressed property sales (REOs and short sales) rose slightly in June, up to 7.6 percent from 7.4 percent in May. Distressed sales made up 10.1 percent of total sales a year ago. Ten of the 43 counties that C.A.R. reported showed month-to-month decreases in their distressed sales shares, with Alameda and Santa Clara having the smallest share of distressed sales at 1 percent, followed by San Mateo (2 percent), Contra Costa (3 percent), and San Francisco (3 percent). Glenn had the highest share of distressed sales at 27 percent, followed by Merced and Siskiyou (both at 23 percent).

June REALTOR® Market Pulse Survey**:

  • Reversing last month’s decrease, the share of sales closing below asking price increased to 43 percent in June, up from 40 percent in May, but down from the highest point of 55 percent in January 2015.  More than a third of homes (33 percent) closed over asking price, and 24 percent closed at asking price.
  • For the one in three homes that sold over asking price, the premium paid over asking price increased in June, suggesting increased market competition among home buyers in some local markets. In June, homes that sold above asking price sold for an average of 11 percent above asking price, up from 8 percent in May and 7.3 percent in June 2014.
  • The 43 percent of homes that sold below asking price sold for an average of 11 percent below asking price in June, up from 7 percent in May.
  • The share of properties receiving multiple offers was unchanged at 65 percent in June but down slightly from 66 percent in June 2014.
  • The average number of offers per property increased slightly to 2.9 from 2.8 in May and 2.7 in June 2014.
  • REALTOR® respondents reported that floor calls, listing appointments, and open house traffic all declined in June, compared with the previous month.
  • While the majority of REALTORS® (83 percent) expect better or similar market conditions over the next year, the percentage of REALTORS® who are optimistic about conditions over the coming year has been on the decline for the past six months from 62 percent in January to 44 percent in June.

Share of Distressed Sales to Total Sales
(Single-family)

Type of Sale

Jun-15

May-15

Jun-14

Equity Sales

92.4%

92.6%

89.9%

Total Distressed Sales

7.6%

7.4%

10.1%

     REOs

3.5%

3.6%

4.4%

     Short Sales

3.7%

3.4%

5.4%

     Other Distressed Sales (Not Specified) 

0.4%

0.4%

0.3%

All Sales 

100.0%

100.0%

100.0%

Single-family Distressed Home Sales by Select Counties
(Percent of total sales)

County

Jun-15

May-15

Jun-14

Alameda

1%

3%

4%

Amador

8%

9%

23%

Butte

9%

5%

8%

Calaveras

6%

10%

16%

Contra Costa

3%

2%

4%

El Dorado

8%

5%

12%

Fresno

10%

11%

17%

Glenn

27%

0%

21%

Humboldt

16%

14%

8%

Kern

9%

8%

11%

Kings

11%

13%

25%

Lake

18%

15%

23%

Los Angeles

8%

7%

10%

Madera

9%

5%

9%

Marin

4%

2%

3%

Mariposa

20%

18%

40%

Mendocino

20%

16%

10%

Merced

23%

16%

16%

Monterey

8%

7%

13%

Napa

12%

4%

6%

Orange

4%

4%

6%

Placer

5%

6%

7%

Plumas

20%

16%

18%

Riverside

10%

10%

13%

Sacramento

11%

10%

13%

San Benito

8%

6%

7%

San Bernardino

12%

10%

17%

San Diego

4%

5%

6%

San Francisco

3%

3%

3%

San Joaquin

12%

10%

14%

San Luis Obispo

4%

6%

5%

San Mateo

2%

1%

3%

Santa Clara

1%

1%

2%

Santa Cruz

4%

4%

7%

Shasta

8%

13%

14%

Siskiyou

23%

17%

19%

Solano

21%

9%

13%

Sonoma

9%

3%

6%

Stanislaus

11%

8%

12%

Sutter

12%

13%

8%

Tulare

14%

14%

21%

Yolo

5%

2%

12%

Yuba

18%

16%

9%

CALIFORNIA

8%

7%

10%

*Note:  C.A.R.’s pending sales information is generated from a survey of more than 70 associations of REALTORS® and MLSs throughout the state.  Pending home sales are forward-looking indicators of future home sales activity, offering solid information on future changes in the direction of the market.  A sale is listed as pending after a seller has accepted a sales contract on a property.  The majority of pending home sales usually becomes closed sales transactions one to two months later.  The year 2008 was used as the benchmark for the Pending Homes Sales Index.  An index of 100 is equal to the average level of contract activity during 2008.

**C.A.R.’s Market Pulse Survey is a monthly online survey of more than 300 California REALTORS® to measure data about their last closed transaction and sentiment about business activity in their market area for the previous month and the last year.

Leading the way…® in California real estate for 110 years, the CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® (www.car.org) is one of the largest state trade organizations in the United States with 175,000 members dedicated to the advancement of professionalism in real estate. C.A.R. is headquartered in Los Angeles.

SOURCE CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS

CONTACT: Mary Belongia, (213) 739-8363, maryb@car.org

RELATED LINKS
http://www.car.org

Florida Housing Prices Report

Florida’s housing market wrapped up 2014 with more closed sales, more new listings and higher median prices compared to the year before, according to the latest housing data released by Florida Realtors®.

“In December and throughout 2014, we’ve seen positive signs that Florida’s housing sector is on a steady, sustainable path,” said 2015 Florida Realtors President Andrew Barbar, a broker with Keller Williams Realty Services in Boca Raton. “Sales are moving at a steady, moderate pace and home prices are stabilizing. Florida’s economy continues to grow, more jobs are being created and mortgage interest rates remain at historically low levels, which will help drive the state’s housing market forward in 2015.”

December 2014
Statewide closed sales of existing single-family homes totaled 22,414 in December, up 15.8 percent compared to the year-ago figure, according to data from Florida Realtors Industry Data and Analysis department in partnership with local Realtor boards/associations. Closed sales typically occur 30 to 90 days after sales contracts are written.

New listings of single-family homes for sale last month reached 24,840, up 2.9 percent year-to-year. Meanwhile, the statewide median sales price for existing single-family homes in December was $185,000, up 6.9 percent from the previous year. December marked the 37th month in a row that statewide median sales prices for both single-family homes and townhome-condo properties rose year-over-year.

According to the National Association of Realtors® (NAR), the national median sales price for existing single-family homes in November 2014 was $206,200, up 5.6 percent from the same month a year ago. In California, the statewide median sales price for single-family existing homes in November was $445,280; in Massachusetts, it was $330,000; in Maryland, it was $250,424; and in New York, it was $227,500. The median is the midpoint; half the homes sold for more, half for less.

Looking at Florida’s year-to-year comparison for sales of townhouse-condos, a total of 9,466 units sold statewide last month, up 11.3 percent compared to December 2013. Meanwhile, new listings of townhome-condos reached 12,438 last month, up 3.4 percent year-to-year. The statewide median for townhouse-condo properties was $149,000, up 8.4 percent over the previous year. NAR reported that the national median existing condo price in November 2014 was $199,000.

“The December numbers are strongly positive for both the single-family and condo markets,” said Florida Realtors Chief Economist Dr. John Tuccillo. “We are seeing the steady and sustainable growth that has characterized the market the entire year continuing as the year ends. Of particular note is the inventory levels in the balanced market range: We’re keeping a close eye on the lack of inventory in the lower price ranges, but by and large, the market is in very good shape.”

Year-end 2014
Statewide closed sales of existing single-family homes totaled 244,543 in 2014, up 8.1 percent compared to the 2013 figure, according to data from Florida Realtors Industry Data and Analysis department in partnership with local Realtor boards/associations.

New listings for existing single-family homes rose 7.4 percent in 2014 compared to 2013. The statewide median sales price for single-family existing homes in 2014 was $178,000, up 5.3 percent from the previous year.

Looking at Florida’s year-to-year comparison for sales of townhouse-condos, a total of 108,354 units sold statewide in 2014, down slightly (-1.2 percent) from 2013. The closed sales data reflected fewer short sales in 2014 compared to the previous year: Short sales for condo-townhouse properties declined 58.2 percent while short sales for single-family homes dropped 50.7 percent.

New listings for townhouse-condos for the year increased 2.2 percent compared to a year ago. The statewide median for townhouse-condo properties in 2014 was $140,000, up 9.8 percent over the previous year.

At the end of 2014 and also for December 2014, inventory for single-family homes stood at a 5.2-months’ supply, while inventory for townhouse-condo properties was at a 5.9-months’ supply, according to Florida Realtors.

Florida Realtors Chief Economist Dr. John Tuccillo said, “We close the books on 2014 on a very positive note. The year marks the transition of the Florida real estate market from a rapid recovery to a path of steady growth. Virtually all the metrics for the market are moving in the right direction at levels that can be sustained.”

The interest rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.17 percent for 2014, up from the previous year’s average of 3.98 percent, according to Freddie Mac.

To see the full statewide housing activity reports, go to Florida Realtors Media Center at http://media.floridarealtors.org/ and look under Latest Releases, or download the December 2014 and the Year End 2014 data report PDFs under Market Data at: http://media.floridarealtors.org/market-data

Florida Realtors®, formerly known as the Florida Association of Realtors®, serves as the voice for real estate in Florida. It provides programs, services, continuing education, research and legislative representation to its 140,000 members in 58 boards/associations. Florida Realtors® Media Center website is available at http://media.floridarealtors.org.

SOURCE Florida Realtors

CONTACT: Marla Martin, Media Relations and Communications Manager, orJeff Zipper, Vice President of Communications; 407/438-1400, ext. 2326 or 2314

Zillow Reveals Top Sellers and Buyers Markets

Zillow

Zillow (Photo credit: damienvanachter)

Potential home sellers in many Western metro areas, including the Bay Area, Las Vegas and Phoenix, are well-positioned to take advantage of locally strong demand and are likely to have the upper hand in negotiations when selling their homes, according to the latest Zillow® ranking of national buyers’ and sellers’ markets.

For those looking to buy a home, Midwestern and Mid-Atlantic metros including Chicago, Cleveland and Philadelphia offer the most favorable conditions, with price discounts exceeding 5 percent in some areas and listings remaining active in some cases for 100 days or more.

Zillow analyzed data on actual sales prices compared to asking prices, the number of days listings spent on Zillow and the percentage of homes on the market with a price cut, and ranked the 30 largest metro areas in the country to determine whether buyers or sellers have more negotiating power in a given market. In this analysis, a sellers’ market is not necessarily one where home values are rising, but rather one in which homes are on the market for a shorter time, price cuts occur less frequently and homes are sold at prices very close to (or greater than) their last listing price. In buyers’ markets, homes for sale stay on the market longer, price cuts occur more frequently and homes are sold for less relative to their listing price, giving buyers more negotiating power.

“As most housing markets continue to improve nationwide, the relative position of buyers and sellers continues to vary considerably by geography,” said Zillow Chief Economist Stan Humphries. “In some markets, buyers are finding themselves in strong bargaining positions relative to sellers, confidently offering less than the asking price on a home they had months to consider. In other areas, it’s sellers that are squarely in the driver’s seat with their homes selling within days of listing, often after bidding wars that increase the sale price above the asking price.”

“Many of the strongest sellers’ markets are in areas that were hardest hit by the housing bust, places like California, Nevada and Arizona, which may seem counter-intuitive. But much of that strength is driven by investor interest, as many distressed and non-distressed homes are purchased and transformed into rentals. This investor activity is contributing to very low inventory levels, which increases demand and helps drive up prices, particularly for less expensive homes in these markets.”

Top 10 Sellers’ Markets Top  10 Buyers’ Markets
1. San Jose, Calif. 1. Chicago, Ill.
2. San Francisco, Calif. 2. Cleveland, Ohio
3. Sacramento, Calif. 3. Philadelphia, Pa.
4. Las Vegas, Nev. 4. Cincinnati, Ohio
5. Phoenix, Ariz. 5. New York, N.Y.
6. Riverside, Calif. 6. Pittsburgh, Pa.
7. Los Angeles, Calif. 7. Baltimore, Md.
8. San Diego, Calif. 8. St. Louis, Mo.
9. Seattle, Wash. 9. Columbus, Ohio
10. Washington, DC 10. Charlotte, N.C.

For a full ranking of metro areas, of the cities within a particular metro or for the data that went into the buyer/seller rankings, please see the full research brief or contact press@zillow.com.

About Zillow:
Zillow (NASDAQ: Z) is the leading real estate information marketplace, providing vital information about homes, real estate listings and mortgages through its website and mobile applications, enabling homeowners, buyers, sellers and renters to connect with real estate and mortgage professionals best suited to meet their needs. In addition, Zillow operates an industry-leading economics and analytics bureau led by Zillow’s Chief Economist Dr. Stan Humphries. Dr. Humphries and his team of economists and data analysts produce extensive housing data and research covering more than 350 markets at Zillow Real Estate Research. Zillow, Inc. operates Zillow.com®, Zillow Mortgage Marketplace,  Zillow Rentals, Zillow Mobile, Postlets®, Diverse Solutions®, Buyfolio™ and Mortech™. The company is headquartered in Seattle.

Zillow.com, Zillow, Postlets and Diverse solutions are registered trademarks of Zillow, Inc. Buyfolio and Mortech are trademarks of Zillow, Inc.

CONTACT: Cory Hopkins, Zillow, +1-206-757-2701 or press@zillow.com

Web Site: http://www.zillow.com

Foreclosure Assistance Just a Phone Call Away

To increase awareness of the Making Home Affordable® Program’s free resources and assistance for struggling homeowners, the U.S. Department of the Treasury (Treasury), the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and the Ad Council today unveiled the third and final phase of their Foreclosure Prevention Assistance Public Service Advertising (PSA) Campaign. To view the campaign materials, click here.

To view the multimedia assets associated with this release, please click: http://www.multivu.com/mnr/59445-ad-council-new-making-home-affordable-psas

Data shows that nearly one in 14 U.S. homeowners has fallen behind on his or her mortgage payments. The new phase of the campaign seeks to identify with those homeowners and raise awareness of free government resources designed to help avoid foreclosure. As announced earlier this year, the Making Home Affordable® Program has been extended through December 2013 and the eligibility criteria have been broadened. Now, homeowners with rental properties and additional homeowners facing a negative change in their finances may be eligible for assistance.

“While communities across the country are beginning to recover from an unprecedented housing crisis, too many families are still struggling with their mortgage payments and are unsure of where to turn for help,” said Treasury Undersecretary for Domestic Finance Mary Miller. “Millions of homeowners have gotten help to avoid foreclosure since 2009. We want to make sure struggling homeowners know today that there are free government resources available to help homeowners avoid foreclosure.”

Ad Council research shows that many struggling homeowners delay conversations about their mortgage concerns because they feel confused about where to turn for help and about whom to trust. With that in mind, Chicago-based advertising agency Schafer Condon Carter created the new print, radio, outdoor and web PSAs to strongly encourage homeowners not to give up hope and remind them that there are free resources available to help.

The PSAs, which are available in English and Spanish, direct homeowners to call 888-995-HOPE (4673) for free access to HUD-approved housing experts who are available to speak one-on-one about solutions based on each family’s individual circumstances, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Additionally, the campaign drives homeowners to the website, MakingHomeAffordable.gov, which hosts robust online resources where homeowners can learn how to address their mortgage concerns.

“Even as the housing market continues to strengthen and stabilize, it is more important than ever that we provide the one-on-one counseling services HUD-approved housing agencies give to families who are still struggling to make ends meet and are in danger of losing their homes,” said FHA Acting Commissioner Carol Galante. “Thanks to the Ad Council’s efforts, more families will be able to take advantage of this free service and receive unbiased advice from trained experts who will help them better understand their options.”

“We know that there are still millions of families across the nation facing the threat of home foreclosure,” said Peggy Conlon, president and CEO of the Ad Council. “We hope to be able to reach these Americans with a message of hope and inspire them to get the help they need.”

“All of us at SCC feel honored to be working with the Ad Council, Treasury, and HUD on this campaign, which is providing real assistance to struggling homeowners,” said David Selby, president and Managing Partner of Schafer Condon Carter, whose team created the ads pro bono. “At its core, the campaign attempts to capture the inertia and intense mental paralysis homeowners feel when faced with the prospect of losing their homes. Our hope is that this advertising will speak directly and powerfully to those most in need of help and cause them to take immediate action.”

Per the Ad Council model, all PSAs will be aired and run in time and space donated by media organizations.  Since the campaign was launched in 2010, media outlets have donated $68.7 million in air time and space. The new ads are being distributed ahead of the month of January – a time when historically many families struggle with their bills and are at increased risk of foreclosure.

The Ad Council
The Ad Council is a private, non-profit organization with a 70-year history of marshalling volunteer talent from the advertising and media industries to deliver critical messages to the American public. Having produced literally thousands of PSA campaigns addressing the most pressing social issues of the day, the Ad Council has affected, and continues to affect, tremendous positive change by raising awareness, inspiring action, and saving lives. For more information, please visit www.adcouncil.org. You can also visit www.facebook.com/adcouncil or follow the Ad Council on Twitter @AdCouncil.

Schafer Condon Carter
Schafer Condon Carter is widely recognized as one of the top independent advertising agencies in the United States. SCC has built its success by challenging conventional approaches to marketing and delivering a tightly orchestrated, fully integrated brand vision for its clients across an infinite set of consumer touch points. A simple mission drives the agency’s entrepreneurial spirit and aggressive, growth-oriented culture: “Think Again.” SCC’s client roster includes: Allen Edmonds, Beam Global Spirits, Campbell Soup Co., Chicago Cubs, ConAgra Foods, Giordano’s, John Morrell Food Group, Land O’Lakes, National Pork Board, Procter & Gamble, Rotary International, Solo Cup and Terlato. The agency’s wholly owned network includes SCC|Public Relations and SCC|Digital.  For more information, visit sccadv.com.

CONTACT: Lisa Cullen, Ad Council, +1-202-331-5052, lcullen@adcouncil.org; Andrea Risotto, Treasury Public Affairs, +1-202-927-8726, Andrea.Risotto@treasury.gov; George Gonzalez, HUD Public Affairs, +1-202-402-6054, George.I.Gonzalez@hud.gov; Mike Grossman, SCC Public Relations, +1-312-222-7478, mgrossman@sccadv.com

Web Site: http://www.adcouncil.org

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